Date: 1963
Brand: Marlboro
Manufacturer: Philip Morris
Campaign: Spacemen
Theme: War & Aviation
Keywords: earth, globe, world
Quote: "All the world enjoys a Marlboro. For everyone knows the special quality of this fine American cigarette. Marlboro's full-flavored blend comes from the land that grows most of the world's best tobaccos. People everywhere have made it the best-selling cigarette in the famous Flip-Top box. For richer taste and a fine Selectrate filter try Marlboro. You get a lot to like, a lot to satisfy you."

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Spacemen

In 1949, on the heels of Lucky Strike's 1931 ad campaign, "Do You Inhale?" and Philip Morris' 1942 campaign, "Inhale? Sure, all smokers do," P. Lorillard released a campaign for Embassy urging smokers to "Inhale [Embassy] to your heart's content!" Lorillard claimed that Embassy's extra length provides "extra protection." The faulty concept was that because the cigarette was longer, it was able to better filter out toxins, since it took more time for the smoke to reach the smoker's throat due to the long length through which it had to travel. In 1950, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) investigators had decided that king-size cigarettes, like Embassy, contained "more tobacco and therefore more harmful substances" than are found in an ordinary cigarette.

Lorillard's particular choice of clich‚, "to your heart's content," was misleading at best . The phrase was meant to impart a sense of happiness and healthfulness. Of course, inhaling would not have made anyone's heart content; Instead, smoking has been recognized as a major cause of coronary artery disease, responsible for an estimated 20% of deaths from heart disease in the United States. Most ironically in the context of this advertisement campaign, a smokers' risk of developing heart disease is thought to greatly increase as his or her cigarette intake increases.






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