Date: 1952
Brand: Camel
Manufacturer: R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Campaign: Movie Stars - Women
Theme: Movie Stars
Keywords: Linda Darnell
Quote: After smoking Camels for 30 days, I found they get along wonderfully with my throat. I especially appreciate Camel's mildness when I'm making a picture!

Comment: In this ad, American actress Linda Darnell (1923-1965) explains why she switched to Camel cigarettes after supposedly trying them for 30 days: I found they get along wonderfully with my throat. I especially appreciate Camel s mildness when I m making a picture! Mildness was a code word, the opposite of harshness, meant to implant the notion that the cigarette brand was actually helpful rather than harmful. Darnell arrived in Hollywood at the early age of 15 and became one of the youngest actresses to star in a leading role. At the time this ad was printed, Darnell was struggling in her acting career, which likely prompted this appearance. Three years earlier, at the height of her career, she had provided a testimonial for Raleigh cigarettes, claiming that No other leading cigarette gives you Less Nicotine, Less Throat Irritants. At the age of 41, she died from severe burns received during a house fire; it is widely reported that she fell asleep with a lit cigarette while watching her 1940 film Star Dust on television that evening.





Movie Stars - Women

The 1920s and 1930s saw the heyday of celebrity endorsement, with celebrities hawking everything from soap and pantyhose to canned beans and cars. Tobacco companies were especially fond of celebrity testimonials, enlisting hundreds upon hundreds of celebrities to endorse their tobacco products well into the 1960s. In these advertisements, movie stars, famous singers, athletes, and even socialites graced the pages of popular magazines, editorials, and newspapers printed across the country.

Famous voices, in this case female movie stars, had a particular appeal for cigarette advertisers. The emphasis on a healthy, clear voice in the movie star s line of work was an ideal avenue for portraying cigarettes as healthful, rather than harmful. The concept was that if a famous actress entrusted her voice and throat her source of revenue to a cigarette brand, then it must not be so bad! For example, a consumer might see an ad and muse, If Lucille Ball trusts Chesterfield, then it s good enough for me. In addition to providing health claims, movie stars were also glamorous and represented a walk of life attractive to consumers who were already invested in tabloids and the lives of the show business elite.

It wasn t until 1964 that tobacco companies were banned from using testimonials from athletes, entertainers, and other famous personalities who might be appealing to consumers under 21 years of age.

The 1920s and 1930s saw the heyday of celebrity endorsement, with celebrities hawking everything from soap and pantyhose to canned beans and cars. Tobacco companies were especially fond of celebrity testimonials, enlisting hundreds upon hundreds of celebrities to endorse their tobacco products well into the 1960s. In these advertisements, movie stars, famous singers, athletes, and even socialites graced the pages of popular magazines, editorials, and newspapers printed across the country.

Famous voices, in this case female movie stars, had a particular appeal for cigarette advertisers. The emphasis on a healthy, clear voice in the movie star s line of work was an ideal avenue for portraying cigarettes as healthful, rather than harmful. The concept was that if a famous actress entrusted her voice and throat her source of revenue to a cigarette brand, then it must not be so bad! For example, a consumer might see an ad and muse, If Lucille Ball trusts Chesterfield, then it s good enough for me. In addition to providing health claims, movie stars were also glamorous and represented a walk of life attractive to consumers who were already invested in tabloids and the lives of the show business elite.

It wasn t until 1964 that tobacco companies were banned from using testimonials from athletes, entertainers, and other famous personalities who might be appealing to consumers under 21 years of age.






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