Date: 1928
Brand: Tuxedo
Manufacturer: American Tobacco Company
Campaign: Movie Stars - Women
Theme: Movie Stars
Keywords: Female, Star, Bebe Daniels, Actor
Quote: The fragrance of pipe tobacco makes me wish I were a man...B. Daniels

Comment: Using words like fragrance , quality and wish I were a man attract women to this ad because it is targeting the emotional insecurities. In the late 1920 s advertisers began to target the emotions and psychosocial needs of women. For young women it was liberation, beauty and popularity whereas the elder women were advertised health, weight and social status. The shadow of the man behind the woman is illustrating that the woman wants to be a man so she can smoke fragrant pipe tobacco. She looks down and sad while maybe wishing she really was a man because it is not yet accepted for a woman to smoke pipe tobacco in the 1920s, except for a few old grannies of the south. Bebe Daniels (1901-1971) was a silent screen actress who played Dorothy in the original 1910 the short film Wonderful Wizard of Oz would have been age 27 at the time of this ad. She was in many movies and played opposite such luminaries as Rudy Vanentino. For a picture of Bebe Daniels smoking (http://silentladies.com/Daniels/pages/Daniels062.html)





Movie Stars - Women

The 1920s and 1930s saw the heyday of celebrity endorsement, with celebrities hawking everything from soap and pantyhose to canned beans and cars. Tobacco companies were especially fond of celebrity testimonials, enlisting hundreds upon hundreds of celebrities to endorse their tobacco products well into the 1960s. In these advertisements, movie stars, famous singers, athletes, and even socialites graced the pages of popular magazines, editorials, and newspapers printed across the country.

Famous voices, in this case female movie stars, had a particular appeal for cigarette advertisers. The emphasis on a healthy, clear voice in the movie star s line of work was an ideal avenue for portraying cigarettes as healthful, rather than harmful. The concept was that if a famous actress entrusted her voice and throat her source of revenue to a cigarette brand, then it must not be so bad! For example, a consumer might see an ad and muse, If Lucille Ball trusts Chesterfield, then it s good enough for me. In addition to providing health claims, movie stars were also glamorous and represented a walk of life attractive to consumers who were already invested in tabloids and the lives of the show business elite.

It wasn t until 1964 that tobacco companies were banned from using testimonials from athletes, entertainers, and other famous personalities who might be appealing to consumers under 21 years of age.

The 1920s and 1930s saw the heyday of celebrity endorsement, with celebrities hawking everything from soap and pantyhose to canned beans and cars. Tobacco companies were especially fond of celebrity testimonials, enlisting hundreds upon hundreds of celebrities to endorse their tobacco products well into the 1960s. In these advertisements, movie stars, famous singers, athletes, and even socialites graced the pages of popular magazines, editorials, and newspapers printed across the country.

Famous voices, in this case female movie stars, had a particular appeal for cigarette advertisers. The emphasis on a healthy, clear voice in the movie star s line of work was an ideal avenue for portraying cigarettes as healthful, rather than harmful. The concept was that if a famous actress entrusted her voice and throat her source of revenue to a cigarette brand, then it must not be so bad! For example, a consumer might see an ad and muse, If Lucille Ball trusts Chesterfield, then it s good enough for me. In addition to providing health claims, movie stars were also glamorous and represented a walk of life attractive to consumers who were already invested in tabloids and the lives of the show business elite.

It wasn t until 1964 that tobacco companies were banned from using testimonials from athletes, entertainers, and other famous personalities who might be appealing to consumers under 21 years of age.






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