Date: 1943
Brand: Chesterfield
Manufacturer: Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company
Campaign: Movie Stars - Women
Theme: Movie Stars
Keywords: females, actors, Claudette Colbert
Quote: America Needs Nurses Enlist Now.

Comment: Claudette Colbert (1903 - 1996) This ad fulfills three purposes: it recruits nurses for WWII (the top line reads: America needs nurses Enlist now ), it publicizes Paramount Pictures new feature film, So proudly We Hail, and, most obviously, it advertises Chesterfield cigarettes (the imagery and copy text for Chesterfields dominates over half of the ad). In fact, the patriotism masks the ad s true intent of marketing cigarettes. The film paid tribute to the nurses in the Pacific War; While trapped behind the enemy lines, three nurses struggled to keep their staff and patients safe and in high spirits. The ad features the three main characters from the film, glamorous actresses Claudette Colbert (1903-1996) as Lieutenant Janet Davy Davidson, Paulette Goddard (1910-1990) as Lieutenant Joan O Doul, and Veronica Lake (1922-1973) as Lieutenant Olivia D Arcy. Colbert ultimately passed away after suffering from a series of strokes, Goddard passed away from emphysema, and Lake passed away from hepatitis and renal failure due to alcoholism.





Movie Stars - Women

The 1920s and 1930s saw the heyday of celebrity endorsement, with celebrities hawking everything from soap and pantyhose to canned beans and cars. Tobacco companies were especially fond of celebrity testimonials, enlisting hundreds upon hundreds of celebrities to endorse their tobacco products well into the 1960s. In these advertisements, movie stars, famous singers, athletes, and even socialites graced the pages of popular magazines, editorials, and newspapers printed across the country.

Famous voices, in this case female movie stars, had a particular appeal for cigarette advertisers. The emphasis on a healthy, clear voice in the movie star s line of work was an ideal avenue for portraying cigarettes as healthful, rather than harmful. The concept was that if a famous actress entrusted her voice and throat her source of revenue to a cigarette brand, then it must not be so bad! For example, a consumer might see an ad and muse, If Lucille Ball trusts Chesterfield, then it s good enough for me. In addition to providing health claims, movie stars were also glamorous and represented a walk of life attractive to consumers who were already invested in tabloids and the lives of the show business elite.

It wasn t until 1964 that tobacco companies were banned from using testimonials from athletes, entertainers, and other famous personalities who might be appealing to consumers under 21 years of age.

The 1920s and 1930s saw the heyday of celebrity endorsement, with celebrities hawking everything from soap and pantyhose to canned beans and cars. Tobacco companies were especially fond of celebrity testimonials, enlisting hundreds upon hundreds of celebrities to endorse their tobacco products well into the 1960s. In these advertisements, movie stars, famous singers, athletes, and even socialites graced the pages of popular magazines, editorials, and newspapers printed across the country.

Famous voices, in this case female movie stars, had a particular appeal for cigarette advertisers. The emphasis on a healthy, clear voice in the movie star s line of work was an ideal avenue for portraying cigarettes as healthful, rather than harmful. The concept was that if a famous actress entrusted her voice and throat her source of revenue to a cigarette brand, then it must not be so bad! For example, a consumer might see an ad and muse, If Lucille Ball trusts Chesterfield, then it s good enough for me. In addition to providing health claims, movie stars were also glamorous and represented a walk of life attractive to consumers who were already invested in tabloids and the lives of the show business elite.

It wasn t until 1964 that tobacco companies were banned from using testimonials from athletes, entertainers, and other famous personalities who might be appealing to consumers under 21 years of age.






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