Date: 1934
Brand: Old Gold
Manufacturer: P. Lorillard
Campaign: Movie Stars - Women
Theme: Movie Stars
Keywords: females, actors, Joan Blondell
Quote: Why are Old Golds so uniformly good, so unvarying in throat-ease and flavor? asks Joan Blondell. Dear Miss Blondell: We are told you know how to make a wonderful chocolate cake. You may not use scientific methods. But we'll wager you measure out each ingredient with unfailing accuracy The same care goes into our manufacturing and packaging too. For Old Gold must reach you well filled, full weigh, and truly factory fresh.- P Lorillard Company, INC.

Comment: Joan Blondell (1906 1979)





Movie Stars - Women

The 1920s and 1930s saw the heyday of celebrity endorsement, with celebrities hawking everything from soap and pantyhose to canned beans and cars. Tobacco companies were especially fond of celebrity testimonials, enlisting hundreds upon hundreds of celebrities to endorse their tobacco products well into the 1960s. In these advertisements, movie stars, famous singers, athletes, and even socialites graced the pages of popular magazines, editorials, and newspapers printed across the country.

Famous voices, in this case female movie stars, had a particular appeal for cigarette advertisers. The emphasis on a healthy, clear voice in the movie star s line of work was an ideal avenue for portraying cigarettes as healthful, rather than harmful. The concept was that if a famous actress entrusted her voice and throat her source of revenue to a cigarette brand, then it must not be so bad! For example, a consumer might see an ad and muse, If Lucille Ball trusts Chesterfield, then it s good enough for me. In addition to providing health claims, movie stars were also glamorous and represented a walk of life attractive to consumers who were already invested in tabloids and the lives of the show business elite.

It wasn t until 1964 that tobacco companies were banned from using testimonials from athletes, entertainers, and other famous personalities who might be appealing to consumers under 21 years of age.

The 1920s and 1930s saw the heyday of celebrity endorsement, with celebrities hawking everything from soap and pantyhose to canned beans and cars. Tobacco companies were especially fond of celebrity testimonials, enlisting hundreds upon hundreds of celebrities to endorse their tobacco products well into the 1960s. In these advertisements, movie stars, famous singers, athletes, and even socialites graced the pages of popular magazines, editorials, and newspapers printed across the country.

Famous voices, in this case female movie stars, had a particular appeal for cigarette advertisers. The emphasis on a healthy, clear voice in the movie star s line of work was an ideal avenue for portraying cigarettes as healthful, rather than harmful. The concept was that if a famous actress entrusted her voice and throat her source of revenue to a cigarette brand, then it must not be so bad! For example, a consumer might see an ad and muse, If Lucille Ball trusts Chesterfield, then it s good enough for me. In addition to providing health claims, movie stars were also glamorous and represented a walk of life attractive to consumers who were already invested in tabloids and the lives of the show business elite.

It wasn t until 1964 that tobacco companies were banned from using testimonials from athletes, entertainers, and other famous personalities who might be appealing to consumers under 21 years of age.






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