Date: 1973
Brand: Winchester
Manufacturer: R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Campaign: Women's Liberation
Theme: Targeting Women
Keywords: Woman, female, man, male, couple, marriage, humor, cowboy, adult
Quote: Let's start with the juiciest part: the proposition. We didn't set out to be a his & hers smoke. Frankly, we thought of Winchester as largely for male chauvinist smoker- and maybe a few leathery, liberated ladies., With a sensuous taste that separated the men from the boys. But, surprisingly, not from the girls. Even women with bras and bridges to burn tried it. And liked it. Because Winchesters not a cigarette.

Comment: This advertisement labels Winchester as a his and hers smoke, which both men and women love. The ad provides humor with its witty faux guns made of Winchester packs and its claim that they envisioned the cigarette would be smoked by male chauvinist[s] and leathery, liberated ladies. By indicating that their target audience was extremely masculine ( leathery, liberated ladies brings to mind women who are tough and decidedly unfeminine), the ad tickles readers with humor while demonstrating that Winchester has a masculine flavor, even with its light, mild appeal. The cigarettes were referred to as Little Cigars as a response to government regulations which banned cigarettes from being advertised on TV; tobacco companies, like Winchester, worked around the ban by calling their cigarettes little cigars, until that practice was banned as well (http://tobaccodocuments.org/rjr/506613461-3570.html page 36).





Women's Liberation

One of the most common techniques tobacco companies employ in order to target women is women s liberation. Specifically, these advertisements show a woman in a position of power over a man, while being careful to keep the power-play light, carefree, and a bit flirtatious. The ads are prudent, hoping not to offend anyone while appearing to take sides, so to speak, with women. Often, these ads distract from the position of power Big Tobacco itself holds over both sexes, by pitting women against men instead of against Big Tobacco.





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